Going Unplugged: How to Have a Cellphone-Free Wedding Ceremony

Living in the 21st century makes it almost nearly impossible to not use any form of technology for more than five minutes. Hence, why having an unplugged wedding ceremony is a foreign concept to many couples. However, before you strike the idea completely, consider the following pros of why having an unplugged wedding might actually be a good idea to implement on your wedding day.

Photo Credit: Shutterstock
Photo Credit: Shutterstock

Every couple aims to create an intimate ambiance at their wedding ceremony, regardless of how big or small. While you are in the middle of saying your vows, you want as little background noise as possible. The last thing you want is for a guest’s phone to begin ringing in the middle of the ceremony. Or worse, your grandmother suddenly thinks she is the hired photographer and is unashamedly walking around, taking pictures of the entire ceremony with her cellphone. And yes, these scenarios can definitely happen. These are incidents that could undoubtedly ruin your special moment. However, thankfully, there are ways to avoid this, should you decide to go unplugged.

So what are some of the benefits of going unplugged? Aside from the facts mentioned above, implementing a no cellphone rule during the wedding ceremony will not only ensure that there are no distractions, but it also allows for your guests to enjoy the moment. While it´s understandable for guests to want to get that first picture of you and your spouse saying “I Do,” it can also be distracting for others around them. Additionally, you may not even approve of the photos they post immediately on social media. Realistically, with a photographer on site, there really is no need for guests to be taking photos during the ceremony.

Although some guests may not be fond of the idea of not being able to capture some memories for themselves, you can suggest the idea of having a post wedding watch party once the photos have been delivered to you. Gather around your closest friends and family, and you can share your wedding photos and video from the comfort of your own home. This is a great way to relive your special day. Then, you can share the photos on social media or on your wedding website for those who weren’t able to attend the watch party.

Photo Credit: Shutterstock
Photo Credit: Shutterstock

What You Need to Consider for an Unplugged Wedding:

  1. Let People Know in Advance: Gently advising your guests of your intentions of going unplugged in your invitations or wedding website allows for them to be informed ahead of time and understand what exactly an unplugged wedding is.

      2. How to Enforce It: To further drive the message home, you can place a nicely decorated sign at the entrance of the ceremony venue reminding guests that they are entering an unplugged wedding. If you still feel that that is not enough, you can request that the officiant make a brief announcement before the ceremony to remind people not to use their smartphones during the service.

      3. Accept That There Are No 100% Guarantees: Be aware that no mater how many times you ask, people will always forget or fail to consider your requests. With that in mind, it helps to be realistic about an unplugged wedding and conscious of the fact that photos of your wedding could still very well appear on social media networks or elsewhere without your consent.

shutterstock_280494548
Credits: Shutterstock

Choosing to go unplugged will guarantee you a ceremony solely focused on what matters: the union of two people that love each other and the beginning of a lifetime of happiness together.

 

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