Honest Fashion Advice…From Total Strangers

Does your look get a Thumbs Up or Thumbs Down?

“How do I look?” We’ve all asked this question at some point, and sometimes we get a less-than-informative answer from our loved ones. An article in today’s New York Times showcases two websites that are helping folks – including brides – choose a crowd-pleasing look.

The two websites, Fashism and Go Try It On, have become big hits, the New York Times explains:

“The premise is simple enough: Upload a photo of yourself wearing a particular outfit. Ask a question or share some details about your look. Users then rate your outfit by clicking ‘I like it’ or ‘I hate it’ on Fashism (or ‘Wear It’ or ‘Change It’ on Go Try It On).

‘It’s for people who want a quick second opinion,’ said Marissa Evans, 26, a former Web analyst and strategist in New York, who started Go Try It On. Ms. Evans employs a small team of moderators to ensure civility. ‘I really wanted to build a site that is helpful, not hurtful,’ she said.”

Brides are taking advantage of the opportunity to get an anonymous opinion when mothers and bridesmaids may be too kind and fiancés may be too indifferent.

“Buying jeans is one thing. A wedding dress is another. Ariella Adika, 28, a fashion creative director who lives in Edgewater, N.J., goes on Fashism several times a week, especially on her shopping trips. ‘If I’m in a store, I will wait to hear what people have to say,’ she said.

When it came time to pick a wedding dress, she took no chances. With the help of her mother and sister, Ms. Adika found a $3,000 ivory floor-length gown by Dominique Daniela at a boutique in New Hope, Pa. It had large origami folds and a black sash that tied around her waist.

She loved it, but was understandably nervous, so she snapped a photo at the bridal store and turned to her friends on Fashism. Nearly everyone thought the origami folds seemed too heavy for her small frame. ‘You’re not wearing the dress, the dress is wearing you,’ a poster, tianaco, wrote.”

Images via The New York Times Company
The Dominique Daniela dress Ms. Adika initially chose (left) was vetoed by Fashism users. She eventually chose a different dress (right) from Modern Trousseau, a Manhattan boutique. (Photos via New York Times Company, second photo by Hiroko Masuike for The New York Times)

“Ms. Adika took their advice and found a second dress at Modern Trousseau, a boutique in Manhattan in the same building where she and her husband run a fashion showroom. The new dress was also ivory, but instead of floor-length with dramatic folds, it had a pleated bodice with a rose-embroidered A-line skirt.

It was perfect, she thought. In fact, she didn’t need a second opinion, and plans to walk the aisle in it.”

Have you used an online service to help decide if your outfit is acceptable? Would you offer up your wedding dress to internet praise and criticism? Do you think this is a helpful second opinion or just a high-tech attempt at conformity?

Read the whole article here.